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HOT Lanes Enforcement Stepped Up

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Local law enforcement is out in full force to crack down on single drivers sneaking into the area's HOV-restricted lanes during rush hour.
Pete Thompson
Local law enforcement is out in full force to crack down on single drivers sneaking into the area's HOV-restricted lanes during rush hour.

Officers are out in full force conducting saturation patrols in order to increase enforcement of HOV laws during both the morning and evening rush hours today.

They're targeting Interstate 395, Interstate 95, Interstate 66, Interstate 270, and U.S. Route 50, during both the morning and evening rush hours, according to a press release from Virginia Department of Transportation.

Law enforcement will be using both moving and stationary methods to detect HOV violators, although they will be trying to alternate the tactics to avoid traffic buildup, officials say. Authorities are reminding people to try to move over a lane if they see a police officer pulling over a car in the shoulder.

Driver Kathy O' Brien, who was commuting along I-270 this morning, says people who don't carpool and ride in HOV lanes should take it as a warning.

"Not a good idea. I'd prefer that everyone follow the rules," she says. "It would be great if everyone could carpool, but I know it's not as easy in D.C. as in other places."

The last time law enforcement undertook a multi-state HOV enforcement actions, during two separate instances in 2010, there were 1,700 violations recorded.

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