MoCo Fire Chief 'Disappointed' By Donation Solicitation Bill | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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MoCo Fire Chief 'Disappointed' By Donation Solicitation Bill

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Montgomery County firefighters usually stand on street corners to raise money to fight muscular dystrophy, but that practice may end soon. Monday the County Council's ethics committee passed a bill forbidding employees from seeking donations on streets during their work days.

Fire Chief Richard Bowers says he isn't sure why the council is attacking a program that helps raise approximately $250,000 annually.

"[I'm] disappointed because the true beneficiaries of the effort by the firefighters are the men and women, the adults and young children that have muscular dystrophy," Bowers says.

Council member Phil Andrews sponsored the bill.

"The fire and rescue employees can continue to solicit for the Muscular Dystrophy Association or any other charity on their own time, or if the fire chief approves and the county executive approves, on county time but not in the road way," he says.

The measure could come before the whole council in the next couple of weeks.

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