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Capital Pride Parade Marches Through D.C.

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Over 80 organizations and hundreds of participants marched in this year's Capital Pride parade.
Armando Trull
Over 80 organizations and hundreds of participants marched in this year's Capital Pride parade.

The parade is Capital Pride's most colorful and noisiest events, and the topic on many marchers' minds this year was marriage.

Over 80 organizations and hundreds of participants gathered at the corner of 22nd and P Streets to kick off the parade, marching their way proudly and gaily through the heart of Dupont Circle.

This was the first parade since same-sex marriage was legalized last year in the District and plenty of participants dressed as brides and brides and grooms and grooms were among the marchers.

The D.C. Council took part in the parade, as did the Metro Transit Police Department, along with half a dozen religious groups and scores of gay and civil rights organizations.

The parade and crowds truly represented a rainbow of colors – African-Americans, Latinos, Asians, whites, blacks, seniors, teenagers – in one of the most anticipated events of the 12-day Capital Pride celebration.

The Capital Pride Festival takes place Sunday afternoon, and will be held along Constitution Avenue, from the Wilson Building to the Capitol. The event will feature outdoor concerts, dances, and booths filled with food and fun offerings.

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