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Virginia Urging The Public To Recognize And Deal With E. coli Symptoms

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The Virginia Health Department's investigation director, Diane Woolard, says each year the state has about 150 E. coli cases, and each is taken seriously. She says when a cases are reported, people are asked what they ate, where they traveled, and what they risk factors are.

"However you can get exposed to microscopic feces, either by not washing your hands enough, or something contaminating irrigation water, on a food where something is being grown, it's often associated with undercooked ground beef," says Woolard.

Woolard says prevention requires making sure food is fully cooked, avoiding raw meat cross-contamination, and thoroughly washing vegetables and hands.

Symptoms of infection include watery, bloody diarrhea, fever, chills, and kidney problems. People who show any signs—especially young children and the elderly—should seek medical help immediately.

WAMU 88.5

Baltimore Artist Joyce J. Scott Pushes Local, Global Boundaries

The MacArthur Foundation named 67-year-old Baltimore artist Joyce J. Scott a 2016 Fellow -– an honor that comes with a $625,000 "genius grant" and international recognition.


A History Of Election Cake And Why Bakers Want To #MakeAmericaCakeAgain

Bakers Susannah Gebhart and Maia Surdam are reviving election cake: a boozy, dense fruitcake that was a way for women to participate in the democratic process before they had the right to vote.

So, Which Is It: Bigly Or Big-League? Linguists Take On A Common Trumpism

If you've followed the 2016 presidential election, you've probably heard Donald Trump say it: "bigly." Or is that "big-league"? We asked linguists settle the score — and offer a little context, too.
WAMU 88.5

Twilight Warriors: The Soldiers, Spies And Special Agents Who Are Revolutionizing The American Way Of War

After the 9/11 attacks, U.S. intelligence, military and law enforcement agencies were forced to work together in completely new ways. A veteran national security reporter on how America has tried to adapt to a new era of warfare.

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