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Ocean City Air Show To Host Nation's Only Stunt Helicopter

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"Malibu" Chuck Aaron will perform stunts with a helicopter in the Ocean City Air Show.
Bryan Russo
"Malibu" Chuck Aaron will perform stunts with a helicopter in the Ocean City Air Show.

Take one look at 60-year-old Malibu Chuck Aaron and you'll first notice his blond surfer like shaggy hair, his handlebar moustache and tattered flip-flops.

But Aaron is one of only three people in the world, and the only man in the United States licensed to do aerobatics in a helicopter. He does things with a helicopter that even the most extreme pilots will tell you shouldn't be able to be done, like barrel rolls and backflips.

The owner of Red Bull energy drink asked Aaron several years ago to modify his BO-105 helicopter to be able to perform aerobatics, but Aaron says the hardest part was to convince himself that he could do the tricks. He says it took him six months to do the first, but once he did, he was hooked.

"It made me so excited that I did 10 more right in a row," Aaron says. "I didn't want to forget how I did it."

Since then, Aaron has become a superstar in the aviation world, and he is expected to be one of the most talked about acts flying high over the Ocean City coastline this weekend.

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