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Metro Reaches Out To Other Agencies After Spike In Crimes

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There's been an uptick in crimes throughout the Metro system this year, especially at stations that have parking garages. This scene is from a carjacking and shooting at the Largo Town Center Metro station in May.
Pete Thompson
There's been an uptick in crimes throughout the Metro system this year, especially at stations that have parking garages. This scene is from a carjacking and shooting at the Largo Town Center Metro station in May.

Metro's crime rate has been slowly creeping upward the past several years, and in 2010 it hit a five-year high.

Now, with the weather heating up, which is often associated with an increases in crime, the chief of Metro's police department is looking to bring in some help.

Metro Transit Police Chief Michael Taborn says his department has met with the leaders of 18 other local law enforcement agencies and asked to collaborate with them on policing areas in and around Metro station. The department got a good response, he adds.

"And we also got support from them that they would, whenever possible, assist in patrolling our parking lots," Taborn says.

Metro stations with parking lots, especially those at the end of lines, tend to be the ones with the highest crime rates, especially a higher than average number of electronic device thefts.

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