Parents of Injured Wootton High Student Demand Apology | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Parents of Injured Wootton High Student Demand Apology

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Virginia law now requires student athletes showing signs of concussion to be removed from the court or the playing field immediately after the incident.
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Virginia law now requires student athletes showing signs of concussion to be removed from the court or the playing field immediately after the incident.

Freshman athlete Brian Jordan was injured by the condition know as rhabdomyolysis after a series of conditioning exercises as part of a pre-football training program at Wootton High School May 4.

In a meeting June 7 to discuss the pre-football conditioning, which Sue and David Jordan claim led to their son's injury, Wootton High Principal Michael Doran discussed changes in the program and coaching staff. But as the meeting ended, the Jordans were upset by what was not said.

"No one's ever apologized to me, to our family, that ever said they're sorry," says David Jordan.

Their son Brian was one of 5 student athletes stricken with rhabdomyolysis after a strenuous workout at a pre-football conditioning session in May. Brian underwent seven surgeries to repair damaged muscles and still faces three months of physical therapy. The other students' conditions were less severe.

David Jordan wants Doran to say he's sorry.

"He has visited him on a personal level," Jordan says. "But no one's apologized in this past month to us about it."

There's a simple explanation, says Doran.

"Sure I'm really sorry that it happened, but I haven't said ... I'm not always for that ... saying sorry," he says. "Plus, if you're in litigation, there's only so much you can do and say."

The Jordans have hired an attorney and are planning legal action.

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