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D.C. Judge Robbed In Metro Train

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Senior Judge Stephen Milliken had his iPhone stolen on his way to work here, at the D.C. Courthouse.
Courtesy of Flickr user OZinOH
Senior Judge Stephen Milliken had his iPhone stolen on his way to work here, at the D.C. Courthouse.

This is where the robbery took place. Senior Judge Stephen Milliken was on his way into work for a busy day of trials and hearings, when someone snatched his iPhone, jumped off the train and ran.

Metro police say the suspect in this case, a young man, got away and officers are continuing to search for him.

Thefts of electronic devices on Metro trains are becoming increasingly common, and Metro's crime rate hit a five-year high in 2010, largely due to thefts and robberies.

Judge Milliken was reluctant to talk about the incident, but he confirmed his phone was stolen and says the matter is in the hands of local law enforcement.

However, the incident had lawyers in Milliken's courtroom buzzing. One defense attorney remarked to another that he was relieved his case got postponed, because he wouldn’t want to appear before a judge who got robbed on the way to the courthouse.

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