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Lt. Gov. Bolling Optimistic About Virginia's Job Force

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Bolling, the jobs creation officer for the Commonwealth, credits the McDonnell Administration for creating about 65,000 new jobs over the last 17 months and dropping the unemployment rate from 7.3 to 6.1 percent.

But he says with the economic uncertainty – mainly on the federal level – there's still a lot of work to do. He expects jobs will continue to be lost and added in the near future.

"The economy is at a point right now where it’s one step forward and two steps back," says Bolling. "But fortunately for us in Virginia right now, there are more good days than bad days. We're seeing more jobs created than lost. We need to keep working hard to keep the jobs we have, and then add new jobs to them."

Bolling says additional jobs will be created by news businesses. But he also explains the unemployed must be patient and persistent the next job.

"And then you have to be very flexible in what you’re willing to take," he says. "There are a lot of people in this economy that are having to take their second choice or their third choice. A job is better than no job."

Bolling says new jobs will come as he and the administration continue to tout Virginia's business-friendly climate to the country and the world.


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