WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Roving Art Gallery Rolls Into The District

Play associated audio
A roaming art gallery that's touring parts of the country has found its way into the District.
Matt Laslo
A roaming art gallery that's touring parts of the country has found its way into the District.

The District's art scene isn't nationally renowned but when Neight Adamson of Find Art Magazine pulled into town he was hooked.

On Tuesday he parked near U Street at a temporary art space put on by Brightest Young Things and Art Wino and abandoned his road trip through the weekend. In the back of Adamson's truck are oil paintings and screen presses from young artists across the states, which he’s selling as he tours the country.

"I sold my own vehicle so that I could buy this truck and turn it into this gallery, and just drive around the country," he says. "Here I'm going 55 cities, 43 states and driving over 13,000 miles with no corporate sponsorship. This is just me trying to make something happen, start a movement."

After sleeping in the back of his truck since early May, Adamson says he was overwhelmed by the District's artists who gave him food, places to stay, and most importantly hot water.

His roving gallery tour ends in July in Los Angeles.

NPR

Yaya Alafia's Songs Of Strength For Her Baby Boy

2013 was a big year for actress and model Yaya Alafia. She starred in three films and had a baby boy. Alafia shares the songs reflecting those experiences for Tell Me More's series 'In Your Ear.'
NPR

Fast-Food CEOs Earn Supersize Salaries; Workers Earn Small Potatoes

A new report finds that the average compensation of fast-food CEOs has quadrupled since 2000. By comparison, worker wages have increased less than 1 percent.
NPR

A Path Out Of Prison For Low-Level, Nonviolent Drug Offenders

The Obama administration announced Wednesday that federal inmates serving long sentences for drug offenses will be eligible to apply for clemency if they meet six major criteria.
NPR

The Price War Over The Cloud Has High Stakes For The Internet

Amazon, Google, Microsoft and others are competing to be the main landlords of the cloud. Their terms and prices could control who gets to build what on the Internet, and for how much.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.