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Arlington County Board Seeks To Reduce Emissions

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Arlington County greenhouse gas emissions in 2007.
Arlington Department of Environmental Services
Arlington County greenhouse gas emissions in 2007.

The plan has no requirements, and there are no penalties if businesses and residents fail to reduce their carbon footprint. But community energy plan project manager Rich Dooley says reducing emissions is a goal that everyone should get behind.

"The whole community needs to rally around this and understand that if we are going to be an economically competitive community, we need to go ahead and collectively address these energy issues," Dooley says.

Currently, Arlington's per capita carbon emissions average 13.4 metric tons of CO2 per year. By 2050, county leaders want to reduce that to 3 metric tons. To achieve that goal, it's a reduction of 2.2 metric tons each year, a goal that Arlington County is hoping businesses and residents will achieve voluntarily.

The county board tasked the county manager with developing an implementation strategy for the community energy plan.

CORRECTION: The original version of this story misstated Arlington's carbon emissions statistics. The county's per capital carbon dioxide emissions figure is 13.4 metric tons per year.

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