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Washington's Miyazaki demands a dance party at the Red Palace tonight.
http://www.myspace.com/miyazakidc/f
Washington's Miyazaki demands a dance party at the Red Palace tonight.

(June 2) MOODY MIYAZAKI The Washington musicians in Miyazaki named their band after the famed anime filmmaker Hayao Miyazaki, but that's where the association begins and ends. The group brings moody, vocal-centered, synth-heavy pop music to Northwest Washington's Red Palace Thursday night. Miyazaki is joined by Brooklyn's Medals, a similar sounding band that adds harmonica to the mix.

(June 3-30) LIFE-ALTERING EXHIBIT VSA, the organization on arts and disability, opens "Shift" at the Kennedy Center's Terrace Gallery Friday. Artists with disabilities are invited to portray life-altering moments both personal and professional in a wide-variety of media.

(June 5) IT TAKES A CITY If you had 24 hours to change your city, what would you do? Teams of artists, architects, engineers, and urban planning types get together at Washington’s National Building Museum to realize the potential of underused urban space in the 24 Hour City Project. It’s a lead-up to the Museum's Intelligent Cities Forum, which you can catch all day Monday.

Music: "Sequence" by Miyazaki

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