WAMU 88.5 : News

Transportation Safety Board Investigates Va. Bus Crash

Play associated audio
A bus crash on I-95 in Virginia in May left four people dead.
A bus crash on I-95 in Virginia in May left four people dead.

Federal investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board are launching a probe of the crash in Caroline County, just north of Richmond. They deploy to the scenes of major accidents for buses, trains, airplanes and boats.

NTSB member Earl Weener says, in this case, his team will look at the bus company's maintenance records and driver logs and will evaluate the way these types of buses are regulated.

"What we want to understand is, are there things that can be done to the bus, to its operation, to the operation of the carriers themselves that will prevent these accidents in the future," he says.

Weener says the NTSB investigators will be on the scene for the next seven to 10 days, but the board may not issue a final report for a year or more.

In the meantime, the U.S. Department of Transportation has shut down Sky Express Incorporated, the bus company involved in the crash. The driver is facing reckless driving charges.


From Trembling Teacher To Seasoned Mentor: How Tim Gunn Made It Work

Gunn, the mentor to young designers on Project Runway, has been a teacher and educator for decades. But he spent his childhood "absolutely hating, hating, hating, hating school," he says.

Native American Tribe Bets On Olive Oil

Once impoverished, California's Yocha Dehe tribe found success with a casino complex. Now the tribe is using its newfound wealth to grow, bottle and sell premium olive oil.

Osceola At The 50-Yard Line

The Seminole Tribe of Florida works with Florida State University to ensure it that its football team accurately presents Seminole traditions and imagery.

Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.