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After Dancing Arrests, Park Police Launch Inquiry

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The U.S. Park Police department has launched an inquiry into the actions of several officers during the arrests of several protesters May 28.
NBC4
The U.S. Park Police department has launched an inquiry into the actions of several officers during the arrests of several protesters May 28.

The protesters were reportedly protesting a recent appeals court decision that bans dancing at Washington's memorials. Video shot at the scene and posted to Youtube shows protesters on the ground with park police officers on top of them, and one protester being thrown to the ground by an officer.

A Park Police spokesperson told NBC4 that the chief of the park police has asked the agency's office of professional responsibility to "initiate an inquiry into the activities of these officers."

"It's going to be an all-encompassing inquiry, and so anyone that was involved, that can be identified in the video is going to be part of the inquiry," according to the spokesperson.

A News 4 photographer was also escorted off the grounds of the memorial during the protest, according to the NBC report.

View more videos at: http://www.nbcwashington.com.

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