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Efforts Underway To Repeal Md. Version Of DREAM Act

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Help Save Maryland needs 19,000 verifiable signatures on their petition by Tuesday and an additional 56,000 by June to get their referendum on the 2012 ballot.
Armando Trull
Help Save Maryland needs 19,000 verifiable signatures on their petition by Tuesday and an additional 56,000 by June to get their referendum on the 2012 ballot.

Help Save Maryland volunteers are trying to collect signatures at Memorial Day events to repeal Maryland's version of the failed federal DREAM Act. They have until Tuesday to submit nearly 19,000 verifiable signatures, the first step in order to place a referendum on the 2012 ballot.

By the end of June, the Board of Elections will require almost 56,000 signatures, or the push for repeal will die. Those behind the effort, like Les Francis, recognize it will be difficult but say even in defeat there will be victory.

"Part of it is energizing people who feel this is wrong, even if it doesn't get on the ballot, they will probably vote for people who are opposing this concept," Francis says.

Organizations that support Maryland's version of the federal DREAM Act are confident the referendum will fail. They say only one such effort has been successful since 1992.

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