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After Wheelchair Incident, Metro Reviews Policies

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A graphic video showing Metro Transit Police officers handling a man in a wheelchair is raising concerns over how MTP deals with disabled citizens.
A graphic video showing Metro Transit Police officers handling a man in a wheelchair is raising concerns over how MTP deals with disabled citizens.

The video shows the man landing face-down on the ground after Metro police officers forcibly remove him from his wheelchair.

Michael Taborn, the chief of Metro's Transit Police Department, says the way people with disabilities are treated is up to each individual officer.

"There aren't any particular guidelines. Usually it's discretion and considerations on the part of the police officer," he says.

But that could change. Taborn's department is doing a review of the way people with disabilites are treated. Metro Board Chair Catherine Hudgins says that's good, because regardless of what the officers' intentions were, the video raises serious questions.

"It was a very shocking video, no matter where you would look at whatever the reason may have been, it was a shocking video," she says.

The man in the wheelchair was initially charged with assault and drinking in public, but the U.S. Attorney for the District dropped those charges and is now investigating the police officers.

View more videos at: http://nbcwashington.com.

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