WAMU 88.5 : News

Memorial Day Travelers Expected In Greater Numbers

Play associated audio

For the second year in a row, travel watchdogs say many of your neighbors will be traveling in slightly greater numbers during the Memorial Day holiday. In fact AAA Mid-Atlantic's Lon Anderson says, 886,000 area residents are expected to travel 50 miles or more, an increase of nearly 12,000 travelers over the previous year.

This might sound a bit odd considering last year's travelers had the advantage of lower gas prices and car rental rates. This time around, Anderson says instead of canceling plans, most folks in the region say they intend to compensate for higher fuel costs by cutting other items in their travel budget.

But 2011's high gas prices are trending down, says AAA Mid-Atlantic's John Townsend. He says that's especially true in Maryland, where some residents can expect to pay 7 cents less for gas then just two weeks ago. Townsend says that trend is helping fuel the projected increase of travel in the region.

Of course with the expected increase in the number of cars on the road and especially over the Bay Bridge, authorities recommend you cross the bridge off peak, on Thursday before 2 p.m., Friday after 10 p.m., and plan to return Monday after 10 p.m. In short, leave early and stay late.

NPR

With 'Formation,' Beyoncé Lights Up The Internet. Here's What People Are Saying

The singer's new music video quickly drew commentary of all kinds — on its references to being black in America, Hurricane Katrina and Black Lives Matter.
NPR

Calif. Restaurant Gives Diners — And Sea Lions — An Ocean View

The Marine Room is a restaurant right on the beach. When the tide is high, waves hit the windows, and bring in unexpected visitors.
NPR

In The Light Of The Morning After, How Bad Was Rubio's Repetition?

"I would pay for them to keep running that clip, because that's what I believe passionately," Rubio said of a much-aired video excerpt if him repeating a line at Saturday's debate.
NPR

Super Bowl 50 Tightens Cybersecurity

This year's Super Bowl will be held in the most technologically advanced stadium in the world. FBI special agent John Lightfoot talks to NPR's Rachel Martin about the threat of cyber attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.