In Arlington Free Clinic, Service Depends On Chance | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

In Arlington Free Clinic, Service Depends On Chance

Play associated audio
Jody Kelly, director of clinical administration at the Arlington Free Clinic, conducts the lottery for health care.
Michael Pope
Jody Kelly, director of clinical administration at the Arlington Free Clinic, conducts the lottery for health care.

The lottery is a game of chance, a random letter pulled out of a tupperware bin. But for the 140 people here at the Arlington Free Clinic, it's much more than that.

"The next letter will be the last letter," announces Jody Kelly, director of clinical administration.

Kelly conducts the lottery. When she pulls the letter "B," the sound of disappointment fills the air. Out of the 140 people who arrived at the clinic, only 25 people were selected. That left 115 people out on the street outside the clinic. One of those is Abraham Haile, a recent immigrant from Africa.

"Well, it's a lottery, and I'm not lucky in lottery. I don't get it. So that's all, eh?" Haile says.

One woman, who wished to remain anonymous, says she recently lost her job and she would like the clinic to see American citizens before undocumented immigrants -- a population that may become the dominant consumers of health care here when the Patient Care and Protection Act goes into effect in 2014. That's when an estimated 400,000 Virginians will be added to the Medicaid rolls.

Executive Director Nancy Pallensen says many of the people who regularly show up here will qualify for Medicaid and will, therefore, be ineligible for services at the free clinic. (Pallensen also serves on WAMU's Community Council.)

"It is so hard the way we do health care in this country. I think the patients get very frustrated. They want us to do what we can't do. We just can't take care of everyone," Pallensen says.

Delegate Patrick Hope says the General Assembly had better start investing more in health care or Virginia will find itself in a serious crisis.

"If people in this room do not get the care they need, where do you think they go? They're still sick. And so they end up in the emergency room costing taxpayers more down the road," Hope says.

If recent trends are any guide, even more people will show up next month and wait for their letter to be called.

NPR

Teaching Students To Hear The Music In The Built World

Cooper Union architecture professor Diana Agrest has influenced generations of accomplished architects. Now in her 70s, Agrest was one of the first women to teach in the largely male-dominated field.
NPR

At Last: Kentucky Authorities Bust Ring Behind Great Bourbon Heist

In 2013, more than 200 bottles of pricey Pappy Van Winkle bourbon vanished from a Kentucky distillery. Tuesday authorities announced indictments in what appears to be a much bigger crime syndicate.
WAMU 88.5

Maryland Isn't Doing Enough To Address Police Accountability, Say Some Lawmakers

The death of Freddie Gray after he suffered a fatal injury while in the custody of Baltimore police has led to the suspension of six officers, but the Maryland General Assembly ignored the majority of so-called "police accountability" bills during its yearly session.
NPR

Google's New Search Algorithm Stokes Fears Of 'Mobilegeddon'

This week, Google started prioritizing mobile-friendly websites in Google searches made on a smartphone. The change could hurt businesses whose sites don't pass Google's mobile-ready test.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.