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With Seat Belt Campaign, Virginia Steps Up Enforcement

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Virginia state troopers issued citations to nearly 27,000 people for not wearing a seatbelt during last year's "Click It or Ticket" campaign.
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Virginia state troopers issued citations to nearly 27,000 people for not wearing a seatbelt during last year's "Click It or Ticket" campaign.

In Virginia's Fairfax County, authorities say they're implementing a zero-tolerance policy on seat belt use beginning this week. The stepped-up enforcement effort and the national campaign will continue through June 5.

Police say more than half the crashes in Virginia that wind up with fatalities involve motorists who were not wearing a seat belt.

Virginia law requires all drivers and front-seat passengers to buckle up. Meanwhile, all passengers younger than 18 must use a seat belt or approved restraint, front seat or back.

During last year's campaign, state troopers around the Commonwealth issued citations to nearly 27,000 people for not wearing a seat belt and counted more than 7,000 child safety restraint violations.

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