No Room For Compost Pile? No Problem. | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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No Room For Compost Pile? No Problem.

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Living in an urban area makes composting difficult, especially if you live in an apartment. But if you're willing to keep your inedible leftovers in a sealed container for a week, D.C.'s Compost Cab will stop by and recycle it.

Compost Cab employee Brian Flores explains the process to a lady munching on an apple.

"What we do is we provide the pickup service and we come to your house with a compostible bag and we clean out your bucket," he says. "All your job is to separate. Like that apple core you're about to be done with, you're more than welcome to put it in here."

After people have been members for nine months, the company will bring you some nutrient rich soil from your waste.

Owner Jeremy Brosowsky says the idea is catching on with both businesses and urban dwellers.

"It is something that people seem to get, which is encouraging," he says. "It is an opportunity to build an infrastructure for urban agriculture in a way that solves a bunch of real world problems."

Compost Cab has been around since September and Brosowsky says he's helping spread the relatively simple idea to other urban areas across the U.S.

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