Local Organization Helps Immigrants Apply For Citizenship | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Local Organization Helps Immigrants Apply For Citizenship

Play associated audio

Becoming a United States citizen isn't as hard as many immigrants think. When Orlando Bonilla, business manager for the Baltimore-Washington Laborers' District Council, went through his group's rolls, he found many workers weren't taking advantage of available legal paths to citizenship.

"We did a study and we found out that a lot of our members are actually eligible to become U.S. citizens," says Bonilla. "A lot of them don't become U.S. citizens because they don't have enough information, they think the process is too complicated, or they feel that, maybe, something is holding them back."

His group spent Saturday putting foreign-born workers in touch with lawyers who could help them get through the red tape.

To become eligible for citizenship they need to have lived in the U.S. for five years or be married to a U.S. citizen for three years. They also need to have good moral standing – as in a clean police record – for five years.

NPR

Multispectral Imaging Could Reveal Secrets Of Martellus Map

A team of researchers are using multispectral imaging to uncover hidden text on a 1491 Martellus map, one of the most important maps in history. Lead researcher Chet Van Duzer thinks the discoveries will allow historians and scholars to see just how the map influenced cartography in its time.
NPR

Diet Soda May Alter Our Gut Microbes And The Risk Of Diabetes

There's a new wrinkle to the old debate over diet soda: Artificial sweeteners can alter our microbiomes. And for some, this may raise blood sugar levels and set the stage for diabetes.
NPR

A New Campaign Ad Sport: Billionaire Bashing

It's open season on the wealthy political donors. Democratic campaign ads tie Republican candidates to the Koch brothers, while GOP ads paint sinister images of George Soros and Tom Steyer.
NPR

3.7 Million Comments Later, Here's Where Net Neutrality Stands

A proposal about how to maintain unfettered access to Internet content drew a bigger public response than any single issue in the Federal Communication Commission's history. What's next?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.