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Prince George's Stands Behind Purple Line, Despite Cost

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County Planning Board Chairman Sam Parker says the Purple Line is expected to spur hundreds of millions of dollars in badly needed development.
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County Planning Board Chairman Sam Parker says the Purple Line is expected to spur hundreds of millions of dollars in badly needed development.

Officials with the Maryland Transit Administration now say it will cost close to $2 billion to build the Purple Line. Just a few years ago, that number was closer to $1.5 billion.

But unlike in Northern Virginia, where local counties are balking at the rising cost of the Dulles Metrorail extension, decision makers here in Prince George's County are holding their ground.

County Planning Board Chairman Sam Parker says that's because the Purple Line is expected to spur hundreds of millions of dollars in badly needed development.

“$2 billion is a lot of money,” says Parker. “But I think ultimately, how the county grows, how the region grows, depends upon the investment, the wise investment of public dollars for infrastructure like this.”

The Maryland Transit Administration plans on paying for around half the cost of the project. They hope to acquire the other half from federal grants.

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