WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Locals Respond To Clergy Sex Abuse Study

Play associated audio
Becky Ianni is a local survivor of clergy sexual abuse. She says she felt "re-victimized" by the results of a recent sex abuse study sponsored by the U.S. Catholic Church.
Armando Trull
Becky Ianni is a local survivor of clergy sexual abuse. She says she felt "re-victimized" by the results of a recent sex abuse study sponsored by the U.S. Catholic Church.

Karen Terry, the lead researcher, called the clergy sexual abuse crisis historic, arguing most of it took place within a defined period of social and moral upheaval.

“The increased frequency of abuse in the 1960s and 1970s is consistent with patterns of increased deviance in society at that time,” she says.

Among the deviance cited in the report: crime, drug abuse, sexual liberation and divorce. When asked, Terry could not establish similar sexual abuse patterns by other groups, such as teachers or boyscout leaders, during the same period.

Becky Ianni, is a local survivor of clergy sexual abuse.

“I really felt I was being re-victimized by some of the things that they said...For example, them saying that it was because of what was happening in society, loose morals. For me the church should be above that,” Ianni says.

Bishop Blasé Cupich chairs the bishops committee charged with protecting children.

“The study shows a sharp decrease in the incidence of abuse by clergy as the church began to adopt safe environment measures,” Cupich says.

David Lorenz, an abuse survivor, who now lives in Bowie, dismisses that claim. He says bishops need to do a lot more.

“We need to know who these abusers are. The Washington archdiocese refuses to publish the names, there are somewhere between ten to twenty archdioceses around the country that do publish the names,” he says.

Lorenz argues this would allow more victims to come forward.

Clergy Sexual Abuse Report
NPR

Encore: 'Future Shock' 40 Years Later

Future Shock by Alvin Toffler was a huge sensation when it was published in 1970. The book perfectly captured the angst of that time and prepared society for more changes to come.
NPR

In Prison, The Passion That Drove A Yogurt-Maker To Arson Still Burns

The yogurt entrepreneur who set fire to his factory remains in prison, but he's in better spirits now. "He's dreaming again," says his wife.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour - July 1, 2016

Kojo and Tom Sherwood chat with D.C. Transportation Director Leif Dormsjo and Virginia Del. Marcus Simon (D-Fairfax).

NPR

'Future Shock' Author Alvin Toffler Dies at 87

Toffler's warnings about 'information overload' and the accelerating pace of change in modern society made his seminal 1970 book a best-seller in the U.S. and around the world.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.