WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

D.C. Area Faces Heavy Rains, Possible Flooding

Play associated audio
Waters from the Potomac River had already begun washing up on the shores in front of the Washington Harbour complex early this morning. The flood gates that can prevent the kind of flooding that plagued the area last month, are erected on the right.
Jessica Jordan
Waters from the Potomac River had already begun washing up on the shores in front of the Washington Harbour complex early this morning. The flood gates that can prevent the kind of flooding that plagued the area last month, are erected on the right.

At the Washington Harbour complex in Georgetown, the effects of the rising water level were already evident early this morning, conjuring up images of the flooding that inundated the retail and office complex last month.

The boardwalk was completely drenched and the choppy water was crashing up over it in several spots, leaving some very large puddles. The puddles were forming close to the flood gates that Washington Harbour put up here to prevent wster damage.

Those same gates being down is what led to the flooding the complex saw just last month when flood waters dumped about 10 feet of water in this area.

While the National Weather Service says this high tide alone shouldn't reach levels that would affect Washington Harbour, but the continued rains throughout the day could cause flash flooding in some areas.

NPR

Why Does Every New Restaurant Look Like A Factory?

The stripped-down look of exposed brick, poured cement floors, and Edison light bulbs is popular in restaurants across America. One reporter dares to ask, "Seriously, why?"
NPR

Why Does Every New Restaurant Look Like A Factory?

The stripped-down look of exposed brick, poured cement floors, and Edison light bulbs is popular in restaurants across America. One reporter dares to ask, "Seriously, why?"
NPR

NPR Politics Lunchbox: Concerns in Cleveland, 'Funny-Looking People'

Our favorite 2016 news and stories of the day curated from NPR and around the web.
NPR

Facebook Shakes Up News Feed, But We Still Don't Know Exactly How It Works

It will now prioritize posts from friends and family — potentially bad news for media companies relying on Facebook for traffic. The company has been under pressure to defend its political neutrality.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.