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Moran May Get His Wish Of Mark Center Delay

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Rep. Jim Moran (D-Va.) says ideally he'd like the Mark Center project in Northern Virginia delayed for three years.
David Schultz
Rep. Jim Moran (D-Va.) says ideally he'd like the Mark Center project in Northern Virginia delayed for three years.

Legislation recently approved by the House Armed Services Committee includes a provision allowing the secretary of Defense to delay seven of the Pentagon's Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) projects.

The Department of Defense's new Mark Center Complex along Interstate 395 is one of those projects, and it is expected to open for business in September.

Moran has written a letter to Secretary Robert Gates urging him to put the project on hold until needed transportation improvements around the area are completed.

"If he doesn't do that, then come the fall people are going to be stuck in that traffic and wondering who in their right mind allowed it to happen," he says.

Moran says ideally he'd like the project delayed for three years while improvements are made, but he says a one-year delay will help.

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