DCPS Special Education Chief Steps Down | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

DCPS Special Education Chief Steps Down

Play associated audio
Richard Nyankori has worked at DCPS for three years.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mvjantzen/5697756073
Richard Nyankori has worked at DCPS for three years.

In his three years at DCPS, Nyankori focused on reforming special education, trying to resolve court cases he inherited and reduce the number of special education students who attend private schools and meet their needs in public schools. DCPS spends almost a $250 million to educate approximately 2,400 special education students in private placements.

Nyankori says he's proud of the improvement in services.

"The system, as it was described by people who monitor it, it's vastly improved. But I don't think just saying it's vastly improved diminishes the urgency at which we still have to work," he says.

Nyankori is the latest senior official in DCPS brought in under former Schools Chancellor Michelle Rhee who has left. Anthony Tata, former chief operating officer for DCPS, left in December.

Nyankori says he'll move to Atlanta to be closer to his family. His last day on the job is July 1.

NPR

Lowly Worm Is Back! Richard Scarry Jr. Brings Dad's Manuscript To Life

The younger Scarry, also an illustrator, found a draft of Best Lowly Worm Book Ever! in his dad's Swiss chalet. He says all that was missing was the final art, "so that's what I did."
NPR

A Food Crisis Follows Africa's Ebola Crisis

Food shortages are emerging in the wake of West Africa's Ebola epidemic. Market shelves are bare and fields are neglected because traders can't move and social gatherings are discouraged.
WAMU 88.5

McDonnell Corruption Trial: Former Gov Defends Relationship With Jonnie Williams

On the stand today, the former Virginia governor defended his relationship with the businessman at the heart of the trial, saying it was appropriate.
NPR

New Camouflage Material Is A Color-Change Artist

Researchers say they've produced octopus-inspired materials that can sense color and change accordingly. NPR's Scott Simon talks to John Rogers, professor of engineering at the University of Illinois.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.