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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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"Son of Babylon" screens Thursday night at the National Gallery of Art.
http://www.sundance.org/filmforward/film/son-of-babylon/
"Son of Babylon" screens Thursday night at the National Gallery of Art.

(May 12) THE ROAD TO BABYLON Shortly after the fall of Saddam Hussein, an Iraqi boy sets out in search of his long-lost father in "Son of Babylon", screening Thursday night at the National Gallery of Art. The film was shot in war torn Northern Iraq with a nonprofessional cast under often-treacherous conditions. Director Mohamed Al-Daradji will be on hand to talk about the experience.

(May 13) A LASTING LUNCH If you haven't made any lunch plans for Friday Northwest Washington's St. Albans Episcopal Church is closing out its Arts@Midday season with an afternoon of song. Vocalist Joan Phalen is accompanied by her friends on piano and accordion for selections by Piaf, Poulenc, and Brel.

(May 13) THE MOVEMENT AT THE EMPORIUM Emma's revolution brings folk rock to Joe's Movement Emporium in Mt. Rainier Friday night. The duo packs plenty of calls for social justice into its muscular acoustic melodies.

Music: "Sail To The Moon" by Radiohead

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Harriet Logan, owner of Loganberry Books in Shaker Heights, Ohio, recommends a graphic novel about trash, a George Eliot classic and a children's book about a bear pianist.
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The stripped-down look of exposed brick, poured cement floors, and Edison light bulbs is popular in restaurants across America. One reporter dares to ask, "Seriously, why?"
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Why Local Nonprofits Haven't Fixed Poverty

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There were more airbag recalls this week, and VW has agreed to pay nearly fifteen billion in its emissions cheating scandal. Meanwhile, cars with driverless technology are becoming available, but whether they will make us safer is up for debate. A look at auto safety and consumer trust.

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