Open Mic Night Celebrates 5 Years Of Multi-Denominational Dialogue | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Open Mic Night Celebrates 5 Years Of Multi-Denominational Dialogue

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Many Muslims report being stereotyped on a regular basis. To combat the naiveté, a group of young Muslims started an open mic night to bring people of different faiths and backgrounds together. The gathering, at the Sankofa Cafe in Northwest D.C., is called Crescent Moon Nights.

It's held on the first Saturday of every month, and showcases spoken word poets and other artists. Tahir Amin Kayum is a co-coordinator of the gathering.

"Pretty much it is different people of all backgrounds, cultures and nationalities, for them to come, express and share on the open mic," says Kayum. "So we have featured artists for the evening, and we have various artists just come up, poets, singers, rappers, whatever, just coming up to share from different backgrounds."

Group members also join forces to perform community service in the region, operating the "Community Sandwich Shop," which collects money for sandwich supplies to make sandwiches for needy people in downtown D.C.

The group celebrated its five-year anniversary May 7.

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