Fairfax County To Consider Traffic Impact Fees | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Fairfax County To Consider Traffic Impact Fees

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Since the new Walmart opened at Kings Crossing on Richmond Highway last year, drivers have been frustrated by the traffic gridlock the development has created. Some have suggested that the county could have imposed an impact fee on the developer to get a turn lane, but Lee District Supervisor Jeff McKay isn't so sure.

"I think it makes sense to further investigate," he says. "But like so many things, you know, it may not be the silver bullet that some people may think it is."

Catherine Voorhees says she doesn't want a silver bullet. But as the chairperson of the transportation committee of the Mount Vernon Council of Citizens Associations, she says it's about time developers start paying their fair share.

"Transportation is obviously needed," says Voorhees. "But this Board of Supervisors, they bow to the people that are feeding their campaign coffers. I think they ought to be ashamed of themselves."

Mount Vernon Supervisor Gerry Hyland says he'll ask for a formal review of impact fees later this month.

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