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Troops Face Challenges Going Back to Work

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"Say for instance, loud noises, bubble wrap, morbid art, wires on the floor -– these are just some of the issues that can create problems for transitioning veterans, and also negatively impact performance," says veteran Ed Crenshaw.

In 2007, Crenshaw co-founded Destin Enterprises after seeing soldiers at Walter Reed Army Medical Center lose their concentration and struggle during interviews with prospective employers.

"They're put in a position where they're forced to be part of this corporate culture," he says. "And they often just have to suffer in silence."

Scott Disney, a combat veteran from Afghanistan says it's one of the toughest parts of coming home.

"When you first come back stateside from being overseas, you can very much still be in the combat mode, that frame of mind," says Disney.

Crenshaw is now working to educate lawyers and universities about transitioning veterans. He says it's more relevant than ever.

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