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Northern Va. Mosque Holds 'Know Your Neighbor' Open House

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Imam Johari Abdul-Malik says Osama bin Laden's death provides an opportunity for community and interfaith dialogue.
Jonathan Wilson
Imam Johari Abdul-Malik says Osama bin Laden's death provides an opportunity for community and interfaith dialogue.

Imam Johari Abdul-Malik is the outreach coordinator at Dar al-Hijrah Islamic Center in Falls Church, Va., a mosque with a congregation of more than 3000 people.

He says today's open house is an opportunity to answer questions that may have cropped up in people's minds after the news of Osama Bin Laden's death.

"What is it like, what do Muslims believe, what are they thinking now?" he says.

Abdul-Malik says he knows there are individuals in the community still reticent about even visiting a mosque. But he says even if they don't stop by Dar al-Hijrah today, this week has given him hope.

I believe in the future that person will wind up even for us saying, 'I don't necessarily like Islam, but I know what it is. And it's not bin Laden.'

Today's open house will feature short films, a 'Taste of Islam' food bazaar, and question-and-answer sessions with Muslim scholars.

The open house runs from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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