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Troops Face Unique Challenges Going Back to Work

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But it's more subtle than you might think, according to Ed Crenshaw, head of an organization focused on transitioning veterans into jobs.

"Many employers and schools inadvertently expose veterans to environmental issues that exacerbate their conditions," he says.

Whether its wires hanging out of the wall, the bubble wrap snapping in the office next door or the blaze of the fluorescent lights in the break room, Crenshaw says these subtleties can trigger powerful memories of combat. Many veterans wind up depressed, and they're not always able to explain why.

In 2007, Crenshaw, a Hospital Corpsman, co-founded Destin Enterprises after seeing soldiers at Walter Reed Army Medical Center lose their concentration and struggle during interviews with prospective employers.

"They're put in a position where they're forced to be part of this corporate culture," he says. "And they often just have to suffer in silence."

Scott Disney, a combat veteran from Afghanistan, says coming home can be the hardest part.

"You're so used to being all keyed up on adrenaline... coming back, adjusting to that low-key life is very difficult."

Crenshaw says now is the time for employers to be aware, as scores of soldiers are getting ready to come home.

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