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Alexandria Jail Named For Slain Deputy Sheriff

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Alexandria Mayor Bill Euille speaks at the dedication ceremony today.
Michael Pope
Alexandria Mayor Bill Euille speaks at the dedication ceremony today.

William Truesdale was moving an inmate from the jail to the courthouse in 1981 when a 40-year-old inmate from North Carolina grabbed his service revolver and began shooting. Truesdale died that day -- the only Alexandria deputy sheriff to have died in the line of duty.

"Like other law-enforcement officers, he represented the thin blue line that exists between order and chaos," says Sheriff Dana Lawhorne.

Now the jail has been named the William Truesdale Adult Detention Center in his honor. His widow, Cita Truesdale Noyes, spoke at a dedication ceremony today.

"At the time of death, even inmates expressed their loss," says Noyes. "He was their friend."

At the end of the ceremony, Truesdale's son took the oath to become a deputy sheriff, following in the footsteps of his late father.

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