WAMU 88.5 : News

Prince Charles Visits Urban Farm in D.C.

Play associated audio
Prince Charles visits Common Good City Farm Tuesday afternoon.
Courtney Collins
Prince Charles visits Common Good City Farm Tuesday afternoon.

For the crowds watching from outside the fence, the prince's visit was cause for excitement. But for the people who run Common Good City Farm in Northwest D.C.'s Ledroit Park, the visit was cause for hope.

The Prince has long been an advocate for sustainable agriculture, is scheduled to give a speech on the subject, as well as meet with President Obama to discuss the issue, during his D.C. visit.

Live music accompanied the royal visit to Common Good City Farm, making the Prince of Wales' touring experience as distinct as the farm project itself. Common Good's younger volunteers, including Loniece Queen, were impressed with the Prince's commitment to this trip.

I think its great even though he just had a wedding and he should have had time for himself," Queen says.

The Prince didn't grant interviews, instead focusing his 45-minute visit on the farm itself. He toured the rows of vegetables, herbs and flowers, watched a cooking demonstration, and symbolically planted a tree.

He also took time to speak to neighborhood residents who just came out to observe.

I think its fantastic that he's really advocating for this and giving this program and programs like it the attention they deserve," says Meg Hannigan.

Common Good City Farm is a farm and education center that grows food for low income Washington D.C. residents and encourages members of the community to volunteer.

Amanda Formica works at the farm every Tuesday and thinks Prince Charles is a fitting ambassador for sustainability.

"England is way ahead of the U.S. as far as its commitment to sustainability and global warming and creating green spaces," says Formica.

Executive Director Pertula George escorted Prince Charles around the farm. He told her Common Good is doing incredible work and hopes his visit will move their efforts forward.

"I said to him, 'I think we'll reach a lot of people because you came here, a lot more people will be aware,'" George says. "And he said, 'that's why I came,'" George says.

LeDroit Park residents don't have a lot of access to fresh produce and healthy food in their immediate neighborhood, says George, which is why she feels raising awareness about Common Good City Farm, and what it can offer its neighbors, is so important.

WAMU 88.5

Anne Tyler: "A Spool Of Blue Thread" (Rebroadcast)

In her first live radio interview ever, Pulitzer Prize winning author Anne Tyler joins Diane to talk about her 20th novel, "A Spool of Blue Thread."


Fine Brine From Appalachia: The Fancy Mountain Salt That Chefs Prize

An artisanal salt producer is processing brine from ancient ocean deposits below West Virgina's mountains. The company, J.Q. Dickinson Salt-Works, ships to top chefs who value the salt's minerality.

Downed Russian Warplane Highlights Regional Divide On Syria

Hugh Pope, director of communications and outreach at the International Crisis Group in Brussels, explains the growing divide between Turkey and Russia on their priorities inside Syria.

From Takeout To Breakups: Apps Can Deliver Anything, For A Price

Convenience is at an all-time premium — and a lot of smartphone apps promise to make many of the things we do every day easier. In a time-crunch or sheer laziness, how far will the apps take us?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.