Northern Va. Muslim Immigrants Differ On Impact Of Bin Laden Death | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Northern Va. Muslim Immigrants Differ On Impact Of Bin Laden Death

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Although bin Laden was not a 'Muslim leader', some prominent Muslims say there has been the mistaken perception that they share his anti-American views. Yemen-born Slaiman al Massri has managed the Al Jazeera restaurant in Fairfax County since 1999, and he says bin Laden's death is cause for rejoicing as far as he's concerned.

He sees bin Laden and his acts of terrorism as the source of most of the hostility aimed at Muslims in the United States -- hostility that he says nearly cost him his livelihood.

"We have suffered -- our business almost lost and we struggled because of him," al Massri says. "Good people and bad people put in one bag."

But another man sitting in the restaurant's second floor lounge argues bin Laden's death shouldn't be celebrated, as was done outside the White House Sunday night.

The man -- who wouldn't agree to be interviewed -- says people should ask God to forgive bin Laden, and move on.

Abdul Limame, a Muslim who came to came here from Tunisia four years ago, says bin Laden's death will do little to change the relationship between the U.S. and the Muslim world.

"If you want to create a contract of trust between Muslim world and America, killing of bin Laden is not really gonna help us," he says.

Limame says he sees bin Laden as a man who used Islam as a facade for his personal brand of extremism.

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