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Maryland Cities Get Green Streets Grants

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The EPA and the Chesapeake Bay Trust are doling out more than $230,000 to help control street flooding in Maryland cities.
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The EPA and the Chesapeake Bay Trust are doling out more than $230,000 to help control street flooding in Maryland cities.

A few years ago, the town of Edmonston in Prince George’s County had a problem with flooding.

"When it rains, that water goes across a parking lot, into a storm drain and underground, and pops up somewhere else," says Edmonston mayor Adam Ortiz. "In Prince George's County many of those rain drops end up in Edmonston."

He says the town has worked hard to stop the flooding, for its residents and for the environment.

"We turned our tree boxes, and most streets have tree boxes, this is the place where trees and plants grow, into rain gardens. So the water naturally flows into those gardens. In different areas we have permeable pavement where water seeps in like a sponge and you’d never know it," he says.

Now the EPA and the Chesapeake Bay Trust are doling out more than $230,000 for similar projects. More than 10 cities received the grants of up to $35,000.

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