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Translators Hope Royal Wedding Will Highlight Profession

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And this weekend, Washington, D.C. will play host to a major section of the global translation community when the American Translators Association holds its annual meeting in the District.

Its estimated that the royal wedding could draw an audience of more than a billion people, but if it weren't for translators and interpreters, the non-English speaking world would just have to use their imagination.

"We want people to understand that the profession enables these events to be understood by everyone in the world, says Kevin Hendzel, who's with the ATA.

He does Russian to English translation in the nuclear and physics fields. He says what's interesting, and sometimes unfortunate, about his profession is that it's mostly unseen.

"It's a very large, invisible industry. In the United States it's valued at 13.5 billion dollars," says Hendzel.

Hendzel hopes the royal wedding will shine a light on translation and interpretation and the potential it has as a career path.

Starting Saturday, hundreds of translators will descend on D.C. for the conference, and the ATA Board is meeting in Alexandria.

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