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Local Places To Celebrate The Royal Wedding

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In the District, The Ritz Carlton kicks off its festivities at 5 a.m. Participants will be able to watch the wedding on a 60-inch flat screen TV in the lobby and partake in a special breakfast buffett.

Of course, short of actually being at the royal wedding, there's no better way to get closer to the feel of the celebration than at the British Embassy in D.C.

"A lot of our staff will be setting their alarm clocks and getting up early to watch it live on television," says Deputy Ambassador Phillip Barton. "The British School here in Washington, together with some of us in the embassy are going to hold a street party at lunch time [Friday]."

Probably the most unexpected place one will find a royal wedding celebration will be at a auto repair shop in Chantilly, Va. Greg Caldwell, the shop owner, says folks who stop in will be able to watch the royal wedding and have their oil changed at the same time.

"We're going to have some goodies. We're having tea crumpets coffee for the normal people and some light breakfast snacks so everybody can get charged up, stomach full and ready to go," he says.

The royal wedding ceremony gets underway at 11 a.m. in London at Westminister Abbey.

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