WAMU 88.5 : News

Restaurants Raise Money For Employees Out Of Work From Georgetown Flood

Play associated audio

The DC Restaurant Group owns a number of eateries in the area -- including The Front Page, Madhatter, and Bottom Line -- and each one will be holding fundraisers for those closed restaurants that sustained flood damage.

It all started because one of the DC Restaurant Group's owners, Jorge Fernandez, is a longtime friend of Nick Cibel, co-owner of several restaurants in Georgetown Harbour. "We wanted to raise money for the staff, to help them out for the month or so that it will take to rebuild the restaurants," says Emily Garber, an events manager for Front Page.

The first of the events is today at The Front Page in Arlington -- off the Ballston Metro stop -- starting at 4:30. Staff will sell wristbands that get buyers specific drink specials until 9 p.m., with all of the proceeds going employees of to Nick's Riverside Grill. Future fundraisers are expected to be held at The Madhatter and some of the other DC Restaurant group spots.

Donations can also be made at any of the group's restaurants to help workers at the businesses at Washington Harbour that flooded when the Potomac River topped its banks last week.


From Trembling Teacher To Seasoned Mentor: How Tim Gunn Made It Work

Gunn, the mentor to young designers on Project Runway, has been a teacher and educator for decades. But he spent his childhood "absolutely hating, hating, hating, hating school," he says.

How Do We Get To Love At 'First Bite'?

It's the season of food, and British food writer Bee Wilson has a book on how our food tastes are formed. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with her about her new book, "First Bite: How We Learn to Eat."

Osceola At The 50-Yard Line

The Seminole Tribe of Florida works with Florida State University to ensure it that its football team accurately presents Seminole traditions and imagery.

Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.