WAMU 88.5 : News

Vegan Bake Sales Sweep Through D.C.

Play associated audio

Standing in front of stacks of sticky buns and piles of peanut butter whoopee pies Saturday, Gary Lowenthal says there’s a big misconception about vegan foods. People think they can't include chocolate, or compare to the treats they're used to.

Lowenthal is a vegan and vigorous defender of animal rights in the food industry. But three years ago, he decided to hold a bake-sale, instead of a protest.

"I think they already have a positive connotation of bake sales," says Lowenthal. "And when they see what a variety we have and they see how good it is…it's pleasing for them and gets them to think about vegan foods."

Loewenthal’s world-wide vegan bake sale has caught on. It started here in front of the Falls Church Community Center three years ago, and it's now spread to six continents and raised $100,000.

"We didn't have much of a budget," he says. "We're an all volunteer group running on a shoe-string, but we had some great help from blogs and so forth."

With vegan bake sales scheduled all over the area this week, Lowenthal says people are starting to coming around.

Bakers will be holding vegan bake sales in the D.C. area this week: May 1 at the Takoma Park farmers market in Maryland and Flow Yoga Center in D.C.,

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Aug. 3, 2015

You can hear female vocalists perform blues and bluegrass at two concerts this week.

WAMU 88.5

Farms, Coasts And Air Conditioning: What Climate Change Means For Virginia

Climate change presents obstacles for just about everywhere in the United States — but rising temperatures are expected to be felt keenly in a number of Virginia's important economic areas.

NPR

Obama To Detail Tougher Plan To Fight Climate Change

President Obama will unveil climate change regulations Monday, expected to set tougher limits on coal than previously proposed. NPR's Scott Horsley previews the announcement with host Rachel Martin.
NPR

An App Tells Painful Stories Of Slaves At Monticello's Mulberry Row

A new app uses geolocation to bring to life a lesser-known section of Thomas Jefferson's Virginia estate — Mulberry Row, which was the bustling enclave of skilled slaves who worked at Monticello.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.