WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Funeral Services Underway For Former Maryland Governor

Play associated audio
An honor guard leads the procession of former Gov. William Schaefer's casket into the state house.
Matt Bush
An honor guard leads the procession of former Gov. William Schaefer's casket into the state house.

In 1994, Juanita Cage-Lewis was working in Annapolis when she received word that her mother's health was rapidly deteriorating. Her mother lived in Cumberland, four hours away. At the same time, a storm hit Maryland, closing major roads and stopping Cage-Lewis from being at her mother's bedside.

Schaefer learned of this, and made sure that a state trooper drove Cage-Lewis to be with her mom.

"The following year my mother passed away, and I got a note from the governor," Cage-Lewis says. "And it has always been within my heart and my family. See, he took the time to take care of someone he didn't know."

Schaefer's temper was also legendary, though many times he used it for calculated effect.

Betty Glasgow, who now lives on the Eastern Shore, worked in Schaefer's legislative office when he was governor. He famously used harsh words describing the region, once vulgarly likening the Eastern Shore to an outhouse.

"He might have meant them, but I still liked him," Glasgow says.

Monday evening and all day Tuesday, Schaefer will lie in repose at Baltimore City Hall. Before becoming governor, he served four terms as the city's mayor, during which he spearheaded the redevelopment of the Inner Harbor.

NPR

Far From 'Infinitesimal': A Mathematical Paradox's Role In History

It seems like a simple question: How many parts can you divide a line into? The troublesome answer was square at the root of two of Europe's greatest social crises.
NPR

Soup to Nuts, Restaurants Smoke It All

While you won't find cigarettes in restaurants anymore, some smoking isn't banned. It's not just meat, either; it's hot to smoke just about anything edible.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Remains At Odds With Feds On Medicaid Expansion

Lawmakers in Virginia continue to resist the $9.6 billion Medicaid expansion on offer from the federal government as part of the Affordable Care Act.

NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.