Clinical Dietitian Offers Weight Loss Tips For Children | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Clinical Dietitian Offers Weight Loss Tips For Children

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  • Don't diet -- learn to eat better. Eat more veggies and fruits, fewer starches and processed foods.
  • Eat smaller portions.
  • It's easier for kids to change their eating habits if the whole family changes how it eats.
  • Don't snack between meals.
  • Eating sweets or other favorite foods once a day is fine as long as you eat them with meals, not as snacks.
  • Don't make different meals for different family members to accommodate picky eaters. Make one family meal and let children choose what to eat and what not eat.
  • One can of soda contains about 10 packets of sugar. One 20-ounce bottle of soda contains about 18 packets of sugar.
  • Juice typically has as much sugar as soda.
  • Eat your fruit, don't drink it as juice.
  • Don't treat a holiday as a "holimonth." Eat what you'd like on holidays like Thanksgiving, but don't continue eating that way the day after and the day after that.
  • A healthy amount of weight loss for teens is 1 to 2 pounds per week.
  • A healthy amount of weight loss for younger children is 1 to 2 pounds per month.
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