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Looking Forward To Final Portion Of The ICC

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The first segment of the ICC highway in Maryland opened for traffic Feb. 23.
David Schultz
The first segment of the ICC highway in Maryland opened for traffic Feb. 23.

The state has now acquired the land that will allow the third and final part of the road to be constructed. It will run from Interstate 95 to Route 1 in Prince George's County, and serve a new development plan called Konterra. That project is something the county has long looked forward to, according to Carla Reid, who heads the county's economic development department.

The Maryland Department of Transportation and Prince George's County have been in negotiations for the acquisition of the property for the last section of the ICC for several years.

"For Prince George's County, this project means more than 30,000 jobs when the project is fully developed," she says.

Construction on the final part of the ICC, and Konterra, has yet to start. The road is slated to open in 2014, while the timetable for Konterra is a little less firm. Meanwhile, the second part of the ICC will open in November of this year. It will run from Route 97 in Montgomery County to Interstate 95.

The first section opened in February, and runs from Interstate-270 to Norbeck Road near Georgia Ave. in Montgomery County.

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