$150 Million For U.S. 1 Too Late To Help With Fall BRAC Traffic | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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$150 Million For U.S. 1 Too Late To Help With Fall BRAC Traffic

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The meeting -- between the congressional delegation, military representatives and Virginia's Department of Transportation -- started with congratulations for securing funding to help with projects around Fort Belvoir.

But Rep. Jim Moran (D) quickly pointed out that the money is not enough, and it's coming too late to make a difference this fall, when 4,000 new people start working on the fort.

"I'm glad that we were finally able to get this after three years of passing this in the House, only to have the Senate take it away. But now it's the 11th hour," Moran says.

Tom Fahrney, with the Virgina Transportation Department, says needed improvements to the Route 1 corridor may take years because the state will have to secure right-of-way property from local businesses.

"There's multiple businesses, churches, historic structures, and a bunch of utilities that will have to be moved. So it's gonna take some time to widen Route 1," Fahrney says.

Federal Highway Administration leaders say it could be as long as five years before major construction can begin.

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