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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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Russian National Ballet Theatre presents "Sleeping Beauty" Tuesday night.
Hylton Performing Arts Center
Russian National Ballet Theatre presents "Sleeping Beauty" Tuesday night.

(April 19-May 17) GABON'S ROOTS OF HOPE Gabon's Georges M'Bourou brings "Roots of Hope" to Parish Gallery in Georgetown. The painter draws hope from his country's women, religious rites and customs. It all manifests itself in abstract oil on canvas paintings of light shining through geometric forms. A lot of paint layering, dripping, and scraping is involved in the process. The results show through mid-May.

(April 19-May 1) IRISH FARCE The process of moving to London isn't easy on your typical Irishman, or so Studio Theatre's "The Walworth Farce" would have you believe. A dissatisfied father forces his kids to reenact their troubled past through cross-dressing and slapstick in the funny and somewhat frightening production. It's in Northwest Washington through May 1.

(April 19) SLEEPER HIT The Russian National Ballet Theatre presents "Sleeping Beauty" Tuesday night at the Hylton Performing Arts Center in Manassas. Tchaikovsky's score keeps a drowsy princess company until her prince shows up at 8 p.m.

Music: "Punch-Drunk Melody" by Jon Brion

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