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Montgomery County Opens First Large-Scale Solar Project

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Montgomery County Executive Ike Leggett (second from right) and other officials unveil a new solar facility in Shady Grove, Md.
Matt Laslo
Montgomery County Executive Ike Leggett (second from right) and other officials unveil a new solar facility in Shady Grove, Md.

Pulling into the Shady Grove Processing Facility, your nostrils fill with the smell of trash as you pass large recycling trucks that are here to dump their loads.

The top of this facility is now lined with more than 1,200 solar panels, which will provide enough energy to keep nearly 600 homes powered each year. Montgomery County Executive Ike Leggett says the now mixed-use building serves as an example of things to come.

"Today we are taking this facility to the next level of making it a sight for the county's first large-scale solar project," Leggett says.

The county didn't have to pay a penny up front for the project because the state of Maryland gave it a grant of $280,000. The state is funding 17 such solar projects, which is projected to nearly double the solar capacity in Maryland.

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