Metro Committee Approves Contract Amid Ethics Questions | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Metro Committee Approves Contract Amid Ethics Questions

Play associated audio
Metro's Board of Directors moved forward with a controversial contract.
David Schultz
Metro's Board of Directors moved forward with a controversial contract.

Metro's finance committee unanimously approved a two-year extension for the company MV Transportation Thursday.

Documents obtained by WAMU show that MV hired a lobbyist who used to serve as one of Metro's top executives and a member of its Board of Directors.

The lobbyist, Emeka Moneme, sent emails to several of the advisers to the Board requesting meetings to talk about MV nine months after he left the agency. But Metro's ethics rules prohibit its executives from working on Metro-related business for at least a year after they leave.

Moneme has refused to discuss the matter, and MV says it did not hire him to contact his former co-workers.

Metro says its contracting process has not be compromised and it has not launched a formal investigation. MV's contract extension is scheduled to come up for a final vote later this month.

Email from Emeka Moneme's office
WAMU 88.5

A Conversation With American Ballet Theatre's Misty Copeland (Rebroadcast)

Acclaimed ballerina Misty Copeland joined Diane to talk about her remarkable career and how she is challenging physical stereotypes that she says keep ballet stuck in the past.

NPR

New Nation, New Cuisine: The First Cookbook To Tackle 'American Food'

The first American cookbook, published in 1796, promised local food and a kind of socioculinary equality. But generations later, foodies are still puzzling over how to define "American food."
WAMU 88.5

Danielle Allen: "Our Declaration" (Rebroadcast)

For the Fourth of July: A fresh reading of the Declaration of Independence, and how ideas of freedom and equality have been interpreted over the years.

NPR

How Personal Should A Personal Assistant Get? Google And Apple Disagree

When you're buying a smartphone, chances are you don't dig too deeply into the personal assistant. Google aims to change that — and in the process, it's testing our appetite for privacy in a big way.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.