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Metro Hikes Not Keeping People From Riding During Peak Hours

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Weekend delays are expected on the Metro for the next 12 months.
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Weekend delays are expected on the Metro for the next 12 months.

A new report from Metro shows that ridership hasn't really been affected by the fares implemented last year and that only 3 percent of trips have moved from the busiest times, in the morning and evening.

Instead, riders are saving money in other ways, like switching to plastic Smartrip cards to avoid those additional fees.

Michael Raush catches the train during morning rush hour at the Cleveland Park Metro station. He hasn't altered his routine, he says.

"I don't really mind. People need to get where they need to go. We're kind of stuck," Raush says.

Metro put the fees in place last year to help fill a budget gap of more than $100 million. The latest revenue report shows that in total, ridership is falling below projections on both rail and bus lines.

The report will be submitted to metro board members Thursday.

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