D.C. Leaders Angry At Democrats For Budget Riders | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Leaders Angry At Democrats For Budget Riders

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For all of the stinging barbs D.C. Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton fired off in her statement following the budget deal, she saved some of her toughest words for Senate Democrats and the White House, saying they had thrown D.C. under the bus.

Other city leaders -- all of them Democrats -- followed suit, saying D.C. had once again been used by both parties as a bargaining chip.

The budget deal includes two riders: one bans the city from spending local dollars on abortions, the other re-starts the school vouchers program.

Even the grassroots group DC for Obama is calling out its namesake, saying the president broke a campaign promise involving needle exchange programs. They promised to hold the President accountable.

"We clearly don't have any friends on Capitol Hill, says Chuck Thies, a local political consultant. "The riders were sponsored by Republicans. They were placed in the budget by Republicans. But Democrats capitulated so there is no one on Capitol Hill who is our friend."

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