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WASHINGTON (AP) Mayor Vincent Gray and Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton say Congress should not treat local government as a federal agency. D.C. officials say a government shutdown would mean trash would not be collected, parking tickets would not be issued and about 14,000 District of Columbia employees would be furloughed.

WASHINGTON (AP) Organizers of the National Cherry Blossom Festival Parade in Washington say they are appealing a decision to cancel the parade in the event of a government shutdown. A federal budget official says that if there is a government shutdown, the parade would be canceled.

WASHINGTON (AP) For the first time, newly digitized Civil War records are being available online. The effort is from the National Archives and Ancestry.com. It will let people trace family links to the war between the North and the South.

WASHINGTON (AP) A leading hospice care provider in the Washington region says end-of-life care is severely underutilized by black people in the district compared with people of other races. The study was done by Capital Hospice, which will announce today that it's changing its name to Capital Caring.

(Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

NPR

Opulent And Apolitical: The Art Of The Met's Islamic Galleries

Navina Haidar, an Islamic art curator at the Met, says she isn't interested in ideology: "The only place where we allow ourselves any passion is in the artistic joy ... of something that's beautiful."
NPR

Wanted: More Bulls With No Horns

Most U.S. dairy cows are born with horns, but most farms remove them. Animal welfare groups say dehorning is cruel. Instead, they want ranchers to breed more hornless cattle into their herds.
NPR

Oil Prices Tumble Again, Hurting Drillers But Helping Drivers

Oil prices are falling, down sharply since mid-June to just over $45 a barrel. That has affected gasoline prices, now down to an average of $2.65 a gallon, about 85 cents less than a year ago.
NPR

Author: Tech Firms' Rhetoric Outpaces The Actual Good They Do

Author Kentaro Toyama says despite tech firms' good intentions, using technology to solve social problems falls short. NPR's Audie Cornish talks to Toyama about his new book.

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