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WASHINGTON (AP) Mayor Vincent Gray and Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton say Congress should not treat local government as a federal agency. D.C. officials say a government shutdown would mean trash would not be collected, parking tickets would not be issued and about 14,000 District of Columbia employees would be furloughed.

WASHINGTON (AP) Organizers of the National Cherry Blossom Festival Parade in Washington say they are appealing a decision to cancel the parade in the event of a government shutdown. A federal budget official says that if there is a government shutdown, the parade would be canceled.

WASHINGTON (AP) For the first time, newly digitized Civil War records are being available online. The effort is from the National Archives and Ancestry.com. It will let people trace family links to the war between the North and the South.

WASHINGTON (AP) A leading hospice care provider in the Washington region says end-of-life care is severely underutilized by black people in the district compared with people of other races. The study was done by Capital Hospice, which will announce today that it's changing its name to Capital Caring.

(Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

NPR

Writer James Alan McPherson, Winner Of Pulitzer, MacArthur And Guggenheim, Dies At 72

McPherson, the first African-American to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, has died at 72. His work explored the intersection of white and black lives with deftness, subtlety and wry humor.
NPR

Oyster Archaeology: Ancient Trash Holds Clues To Sustainable Harvesting

Modern-day oyster populations in the Chesapeake are dwindling, but a multi-millennia archaeological survey shows that wasn't always the case. Native Americans harvested the shellfish sustainably.

NPR

Twitter Just Turned VP Nominee Tim Kaine Into Your Dad

Democratic vice presidential nominee Sen. Tim Kaine introduced himself to America Wednesday night as a fighter, Hillary Clinton's ally and — your dad.
NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

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